COCO

When she came, she was a little ball of fur, but what we got was unexpected. Coco was to be the most independent, self-willed dog we ever had. She was never submissive to an older dog and most of all, she loved to play BALL! Shelia had her hands full keeping Coco in line, but she was a good “mom” and did her best.
From the very start Coco was hole hog when she played, ran or whatever. Coco was a very over active dog. If she was lying down, and Jette or I got up, she was up in a flash with a ball headed to the door. It wasn’t until after she was three or so, when I just moved in my chair, her head would raise up to see what was going on, I’d life my hand, palm facing her, telling her to stay. Soon she learned this and I could get up without her exploding to the door. She would chase a ball and many times end up rolling on the ground with the ball. From the beginning she was very hard on herself, never slowing down, never accept second best, and she was a talker! In her whole life she never showed any pain, as if pain was something she never felt.
When it was time to go for a walk, she was so excited she was jumping up and down, and talking. It wasn’t a bark, more a combination of a bark and a yowl. This was something she never lost. In the mornings when it was time to get up, she started, I never needed an alarm clock. She would coming running upstairs and make sure I was up. She would run down stairs and wait for me, banging away with her tail on everything. She was so happy I was up, her tail going, moving between my legs I could hardly walk. Even if I had to piss like a race horse, I had to take that time to pet her, hundred percent focused only on her. When she was satisfied, outside she’d go, and I got to pee. Coco very rarely licked me, instead if I was lying on the couch she would come up and touch her nose to mine, that was her greeting to me. She knew me and I knew her.
The ball was her lifelong joy and pleasure. No matter the time of day, she loved to play ball. If I was sitting down, she’d come set down with a ball in her mouth. One thing at the beginning I never reached down to pick a ball up, she was so lightening fast she’d nab it in a flash of light, no matter if my fingers were there or not. I learned early to step on the ball first, then she’d back off a bit. But best of all was to have two or three balls at the ready. If she had one in her mouth, she’d cover the second one with her paw, pressing so hard it was almost impossible to get it free.
Yes, Coco was the most challenging dog we ever had, but despite all the problems and such, we loved her very much. The last couple days after her passing, I have found just how empty my life is without her. No more waking me early in the mornings. No more greeting me when I come home. As I said she was very vocal, her special sounds and language – the house is silent now. She knew our routine. She knew when I was going to work. Mornings I’d play a little ball with her, she was so keyed up. All I had to say, was “Bye-bye Coco, I got to go to work”. Immediately she’d drop the ball, come smiling, wagging her tail to me so I could pet her for a while, then it was ok for me to leave. As I would drive off, I’d look back and see her laying in front of the door on her blanket watching me drive off.
I remember when Shelia passed on, Coco grew up over night. From being a puppy to “Head of the house”. For two months she was on her own, but it made no difference to her, she was a little calmer being the only dog, but her love for play and being never changed. When we got a new puppy to replace Shelia, it was a big problem – she wanted to attack her. It was a very difficult, challenging week or so. We couldn’t let both of them free at the same time. We had a divider in the house to separate them and I had to make a fence down the middle of the yard. With them on each side of their yard, she could get use to the new puppy. Finally she gave in and it was ok. I was surprise how submissive she got to Gabby – Coco turned into a puppy again. When Coco came to Gabby she’d automatically wash her face – this never stopped, she continued right to the end.
When we got Coco, Shelia was older and didn’t really play as much with her, now Coco turned into a puppy playing with Gabby. She would lay on her back and allow Gabby to be the “Aggressor”, teaching Gabby how to attack and defend in their play. At first Gabby cared nothing for a ball, but soon she learned from Coco the “Ball” was good. These two would chase each other through the house – around the chairs, under the table. Finally Coco would fall to the floor, roll on her back and allow Gabby to “attack” her at the end.
Yes in a way some of Coco still lives on in Gabby because of all the things Gabby learned from Coco. This is one thing we always liked, how the new one learned from the old one. But Gabby is the wife’s dog, she hangs on her, like Coco hung on me. I love Gabby, but I got a very big empty place I my life with Coco gone as she was my dog. Coco, you will always be missed every time I come home, getup in the mornings, get out of my chair, go out the door. You knew my life, routine, everything. You felt my love for you and gave so much, I will never forget you – even if you were a real pain in the ass. Good-bye Coco (Aug 2013 – Mar 2019), you will forever be missed, and always loved.

MY RYDER CUP

Competed in my first match play game of golf – it was fantastic. I thought being hooked on golf was something, but now I have discovered match play. This is where handicap has no play, you against the other guy, counting strokes to win a hole. Whoever wins the most holes wins the match.
I couldn’t believe how good I played, yea if I could reach around I would pat myself on the back! I believe it brought out the best play in me because I was counting not only my strokes, but his as well. My short game was almost perfect. I only really screwed up a couple long chip-ins, and one of my short chips. If I screwed up, had a bad shot, then I would start thinking, “Ok he’s a stroke ahead, where can I make it up”. I found myself focusing more on the ball when shooting, thus getting more good shots. For example: One par five was about a forty five degree bend to the right. My tee shot was way too much to the right, just about inside the trees. I looked at my opponent’s ball, he was sitting good in the middle of the fairway, crap, I was going to get a shot behind getting around the corner – unless I could go over the trees. The only problem was there was a little tree almost in my way, I looked at it and thought if I got a good shot I could make it – go for it. I got my hybrid 4, picked my direction and thought, “Watch the ball, rotate the body, now hit the ball.” I did, a good shot, I could feel the solid whack and hear the sound as well. It climbed over the trees, I watched I could see it bounce on the fairway, I did it. That was my second shot. My third shot I landed on the green, but rolled just across to the other side. Now I had about a 12-14 meter putt. My opponent hit the bunker and had to get out, now I was a stroke ahead. My putt was good, I was short, about two feet from the hole. My next shot was in – par. I won the hole all because I took the chance.
I had some bad shots as well. One hole (par 5) I duffed my tee shot, lucky enough it ran a ways, but I was only half way to my opponent’s ball. My next shot with my fairway wood I topped the ball and watched as it just went over a little rise – directly for a ditch crossing the fairway! I just knew I lost my ball. My opponent was sitting great, he took his next shot and came to help me look for my ball. He found it just about a foot below the edge of the ditch, playable but tough. I took my sand wedge, tried my best to get a good footing on the side of the ditch, whack, amazingly enough it popped out about 30 meters forward. I was relieved, he was a stroke ahead. We both got on the green. I missed, he went in. I lost the hole, but just had to putt the ball in for a finish to a bad hold.
Lots of give and take, him winning a hole, me winning it back, coming even on many holes. I won the first two holes outright. We tied the next couple. I won another couple, only first dropping a hole on the eighth. I wasn’t keeping score, and I wasn’t keeping count of how many we tied, but I was keeping track of my wins. Finally after hole 17, as he picked up after I holed my ball, he stuck out his hand and said, “Congrats, you won”. I must have looked surprised because he repeated it. I stuck out my hand and said thanks, then I remembered I screwed up – forgot to take my hat off (guys must do), so I apologized, removed my had, stuck out my hand and did it right. He then said, “Shall we play the last hole just for fun?”, of course I said, after all I have no idea when I will play this course again. So we played the last hole, not keeping track of strokes.
I know it’s not the same, but I understand how the guys playing the Ryder Cup must feel when they win a match! Yea, for me there was no crowds, no big prize (in fact it cost me to win, I had to buy his first drink), but this was my first match play game and I had WON, bringing home a win for my team. I was on cloud nine. I just wanted to jump up and down and shout to the world, but I didn’t, somehow I remained proper and respectable. Afterwards the opposing team had food ready, all I had to do was buy my opponent his first drink (their rules), I didn’t mind. This first win ranks right up there with the first deer I ever shot, the first saddle bronc I came out on, calling in a bull elk within about 10 meters. Yea, it is one for the memory books.

EASTER

I received an e-mail from a cousin’s husband talking about Easter past, which got me to thinking while laying in bed, so here the first thing, the day after Easter I get to writing. Even though it is late, I still need to get it written.
One of my first memories of Easter was a few days before Mom would hard boil some eggs so my brother and I would have fun dipping them in the different colors. We’d then take turns hiding them and finding them. Living out on the farm, we didn’t have many others to do this with, so we had lots of “family” fun. Then Dad got a little short cut – he bought some chickens who would lay colored eggs. If I remember right, they came from South America.
Many times before Easter Sunday we would get kitted out with a new suit jacket, shirt and tie so come Easter Sunday we would go to church in our new clothes. Mom would usually have a new hat to go along with her new dress. It was a special time of the year, days were getting longer, weather was getting better. Usually Easter time Dad had would go to the feed store and buy about 50 chicks or so to raise through the year. Yep, it was truly a special time of the year.
After I got older, in my teens, I remember going to Lizard Butte for Easter sun rise services. Most of the time this was with a youth group from church. Lizard Butte is a large rocky outcrop, overlooking the Snake river at Marsing, Idaho. It gets its name because it looks like a resting lizard with its head reared up. Anyway, it was always a sight to behold, on a beautiful, clear morning, the sun would crack the dawn. Many times it was a little frosty, but it was a fantastic experience celebrating Easter Morning with so many others in the wide open spaces overlooking the Snake River and the majestic Owyhee Mountains behind.
We didn’t go out to eat much, but Easter dinner was different. After attending the First Christian Church in Caldwell, Idaho, Dad would take us out to dinner. After all, we were all dressed up in new clothes and why not? I don’t know if Dad phoned to make reservations or if we just went and showed up, but Pollards in Caldwell was where we always went. It was a very nice, family styled restaurant and the food was good.
I have in my later life had some memorial Easters as well. 1996 I was part of a command and control team at Cowboy TOC over the Sava River at Zuponja, Croatia. No sunrise services, just controlling convoys headed south to Bosnia during Operation Joint Endeavor. 2001 I spent Easter at the NATO Headquarters in Pristina, Kosovo during Operation Joint Guard. I remember that morning standing outside my office which was the top of a double stacked set of containers having a cup of coffee overlooking the local cemetery with lots of freshly made graves. It was also a nice morning. 2003 I did Easter services at Camp Virginia, Kuwait. I think it was the most special one I remember. We were at war and yet time was found to attend services with my Brother/Sisters –in- arms.
What’s so amazing, all these memories would not be possible except for one moment in time. The day an empty tomb was found and angles announced, “He’s not here He has risen”. We think of the Easter bunny, colored eggs and such, but true Easter is to remember not the sacrifice Jesus made for me and everyone else, but the fact He is still alive and is the way to everlasting life for all. Today I don’t attend church much, but He is with me all the time, and yes this year Easter was a fantastic, beautiful day and I am thankful for the promise it gives to me.

BACK IN THE SADDLE AGAIN

Finally, after a long winter I am back to work and play! 12 November last year I received a new left knee. It wasn’t major surgery, but it is taking a long time to recover. Even now I am not up to full work, only about half time, but it is great to get out of the house. Worst part is I got my two dogs spoiled. They now think every morning I should devote at least twenty minutes or so playing ball, then every afternoon the same.
I was given an injection in my back, deadening me from the waist down, so I was able to hear the entire operation. Saw, grinder, hammer, chisel and staple gun. I figured out I got all the tools for to do the right knee, just need to contact my local vet to see about getting some drugs.
The guy in the bed next to me had his right knee done right after me. Later in the afternoon he suggested we take a walk, so we got our walkers, threw a robe on and headed for the elevator, down and out side. It was great to get some fresh air, my partner needed a smoke. Was a good walk, best part my left leg was still dead – then it woke up.
Didn’t get much sleep that night. They gave me some pain pills, but they did no good. The one thing that helped was ice. I kept the nurses busy all night getting cold packs which was great. The next morning the nurse told me I could take my walker, go up the hall to where they had breakfast ready. I got my walker started out. I got about three quarters of the way there and all of a sudden started to feel funny, oh no, so I backed my walked up to the wall, set the brakes, turned around, sat down and passed out. I woke up with four or five nurses standing around me, I was still sitting. They had my bed there and got me back in. The nurse in charge of me asked if I was in pain, I said yes. She asked if I had taken any pain pills, I said just what they gave me. She asked why I didn’t say something. I told her what was pain? I have lived with pain, worked with broken bones so I just dealt with it. Now she really got pissed off. She said this was the reason I passed out because my body said enough and just shut down. They got me back to my room and gave me two little blue pills. I guarantee I took a trip and never left my bed!
The other thing which helped me get through the long night was I thought ahead, brought the charger for my mobile phone. I knew they had free internet, so I was able to plug in a couple of my favorite talk radio stations, KBOI and KFSO – great listening to talk radio to help pass the time of night. First time I was thankful for a smart phone.
Getting into the car for the ride home was tough, but great to get out of there. I will have to say the food was good. Jette fixed up the couch/sofa in the office for me to sleep at nights so I didn’t have to go up stair. She was great in support. Guess the best part is for the first time since I have been living here she fixed breakfast for me. Not a real breakfast, just the Danish type, but who am I to complain. Probably the best for me, as if I’d had a real breakfast every morning I’d have gotten real fat! Even now she still does it for me, so no complaints here!
After the New Year, I started riding out with another farrier a couple days a week, just to get out of the house (I think Jette was glad as well). Twice a week to the rehab center plus the stationary bike one of my fantastic customers loaned me, I put myself to work. As the old saying goes, “No pain, no gain”, I must have gained a whole lot. Having our riding hall was great as well. During rainy weather I was able to get out and walk without getting soaked. January I also got access to my shop to train up my hands, arms and muscles for work. Then came the first of Feb – back to work.
It was tough the first few horses and I am so thankful to my customers for being very understanding. I also want to thank all the other farriers who supported me and cared for my customer’s horses. Everyone I have been out to has been so supportive and glad I am back. I enjoy getting back to work on their horses, we talk, have some coffee and a general good time while I am working.
Yea, I have lost some customers. Some have taken on the farrier they had do their horse, well that’s their choice and I respect it. What I don’t respect is the fact some have refused my calls, text messages and such. I don’t know what is so hard about telling me they took someone else – people.
Best of all I have been able to hit the golf course again, started out doing a few swings and such. This past Friday I did my first 18 holes, the longest I have walked since the operation. Yea I was pooped, in fact I was kind of struggling through the back nine, but I wanted to complete it. I played probably the worst game I ever played, but a good score wasn’t the goal. Goal was completing the course. My body was so sore afterwards, but I was surprised my knee wasn’t swollen more than normal. In two weeks my course opens up and I know I will be struggling as it is pretty hilly, but looking forward to it. Saturday a friend and I played around a nine hole course. It was flat and not as long as a regular 18 hole course so we went around twice. I actually played pretty good.
By no means am I to full speed but I am gaining every day. I will be increasing my work as time goes along as well as my golf game. Best thing is spring is just about here, longer, warmer days to play more golf. My rehab instructor told me golf was a great sport to play as it is one where I can go at my own speed. I am also looking forward to the point in time when all the pain and swelling are gone. I was told before the operation it could last six to eight month afterwards, so I am still ignoring the pain. Best part is everyone I have talked to say after the first few months they are so glad to have had the operation. This is the time I am looking forward to.

2018 in Review

And so another year has slipped by, kind of makes a guy wonder where it all goes.
This year has been good and also different. I really got into the game of golf. If you would have told me a couple years ago I would love the game of golf I would have told you you’re crazy, but it is great. Another reason I took up golf was for the exercise. Since my knees have gotten bad and I knew replacements were needed, I needed the exercise, thus another good reason for golf. I’m not all that great, handicap is 31.5, but I am having a great time. I have also met some really great people on the course as well. In June I went to Sweden to compete in a farrier competition with a good friend, Tom Williams, who competed as well. We just happened to take our golf clubs with us and daily after the competition we hit the course for 18 holes. It was great in Sweden because it didn’t get dark until about 2300hrs, so it was fantastic.
Because of my knees I have cut down on my work. Cutting down has helped a lot. Before I cut down, many nights I’d get home and couldn’t hardly walk, it was a real chore to get up the next morning and go to work. Yes, this year, after playing 18 holes of golf my knees were sore, but it was needed as I had to keep up some good exercise, as we say, “No pain, no gain”.
Before my knee operation I took my annual trip to Portugal. I didn’t get a vacation last year because of my knees, so it was greatly needed this year. It was a good time with mixed weather. Lots of rainy days, but we also had some good weather as well. The most important thing was I had a great time with an old friend.
This knee operation has been the hardest thing I have ever faced. I never really knew what my pain threshold was until now. I’ve walked out of the mountains with broken bones in my foot, worked with broken toes, had horseshoe nails pulled through my body, kicked in the face by horse, but this is the first time my body shut down because of pain, at least that’s what the nurse told me after I passed out the morning after the operation. I’d walked up to get my breakfast and boom, out I went. Later on the nurse proceeded to chew me out for not taking enough pain killers, she then gave me some and I took a trip and never got out of bed. It’s a little over a month ago since the operation. I am now walking most of the time with no crutches, still have some problems sleeping at nights because of the aches in my knee and leg. Before the operation I was hoping for about the first of January to get back to work, but now I think it might be more to the end of January (I hope).
Jette had decided to trade off her truck for a smaller horse transport. Because of all the rules and regulations coming out, it will be much more cost effective to down size. She has also decided to down size on horses as well. I don’t know all the ins and outs of her decision but I also know we are not 30 no more and I have a feeling she wants to cut down on all the work.
Weather this year has been different. Jette said she has never seen a summer so hot and dry as we did this year. Lot of crops dried up, I know our pastures did. Many who have horses and cattle began to use their winter feed during the summer (I know we did). Lot of farmers began to slaughter their cattle early as they couldn’t feed them all winter. Will be interesting to see how things end up this coming spring. We are now into a typical winter. We had a bunch of rain this fall and now we got freezing weather. One thing I have always hated is the long, dark winter days here. It doesn’t really get daylight until the morning is about half over and it gets dark about mid afternoon. I can’t wait until 21 December passes (shortest day of the year). I think it should be a holiday and we can celebrate days are getting longer.
Our two dogs, Coco and Gaby are now sleeping, relaxed as we just got in from our morning game of ball. Being home the past month I take them out and play ball every morning, then go for a walk as the beginning of my rehab training. Jette and I have always had two dogs and love them very much (as we never had kids). They are both very different and special in their own ways.
I am wishing all of you a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. I am not politically correct and hope I never am, so if anyone is offended, I really don’t care. You all be good and remember: It is only you who takes the step away from God, He will never step back from you. I hope you all have a great Holiday Season and the coming year if full of joy and love.

OLD YEAR GONE, NEW YEAR BEGINS

So I have once again successfully completed another vacation. Sitting here in the Lisbon airport with a few hours to kill is giving me time to reflect on the passed year. My year begins with the ending of my annual trip to vegetate in Portugal with John. It is a time of reflection, regeneration and just plain whatever. This year’s trip will have a little different meaning for me as when I return, the following Monday will go under the knife for a new left knee. Am I worried about it, apprehensive or scared – not really. I am just put out at myself for falling apart.
You see, my whole life I have been fit as a fiddle, able to do what I wanted, go where I wanted to go and such. Now I find myself acting like the “old” guys I used to see coming to my hunting camps when I was a guide. Or the old guys walking down the street. I used to, well not really think about them, but I would in the back of my mind, without thinking about it, run through my head – “Boy, sure glad I’m not that old guy.” I got out of bed this morning in my hotel room and looked at the person staring back at me and I almost didn’t recognize him. I just stood there for what seemed like hours (actually less than a minute) wondering how I had changed into this old gray bearded, fat guy, instead of what I used to be. I remember back so many years ago, an “old” guy once told me: If you see something is life you want to do, then do it because there will come a day when you won’t be able to, and if you didn’t, you’ll look back and say, I wish I’d have done that. Well most of my life I have always taken that chance, gone out on a limb and tried something different. I look back and I have had a good life. I have had many great opportunities and gone ahead with them – it has been fun.
I got paid to do things many people pay to do. Being a professional guide was good. It was a lot of work. I remember so many good times, fun times. There were also many long days, hard work. Times where it was cold, wet and I wondered if it was worth, but that thought only lasted about two seconds – even on a bad day (which there never really were).
Growing up I used to hear: Join the Navy – See the world. Well I joined the Army Reserve and have seen more places in the world than I ever thought I would. Yes, may times it wasn’t that great vacation place, but many times I got to visit history, to see where history was made, to walk in the steps of men who’d gone before me I had only read about
I have meet people from all over the world. This morning I had breakfast with a former princess of Russia – Anastasia ( we laughed about that one). She was a beautiful 24yr old gal living in Moscow who have been in Lisbon for an international web seminar. She came from a small island in the northern Pacific, attended university in Moscow, went to work for Microsoft, but now has her own business. Before her I shared a cup of coffee with a great young man from Spain who had also attended the same event. He was great to talk with. Having the chance to meet and talk with people from all over the world lets me expand my knowledge and vision.
But the thing I am most thankful for is the beginning I had. My brother and I were adopted, and the people who wanted us were the best in the world. I was give fantastic values and a direction in life. I had a great life where I learned as a very young kid what hard work was and to accept responsibility. I learned early life wasn’t always a bed of roses and I wouldn’t always get what I wanted, but I would have what I needed. So many times our wants out race our needs and when it come down to it, our needs are very small compared to what we really think. I also learned after I left home, two things I never ask God for – a place to say and something to eat. God provides this for the birds of the air, so I knew and have always had faith these two things would always be provided to me. I may not have always had the best place to stay, nor the fancy foods to eat, but I have never needed.
So now I begin a new year, and it will be interesting to see how this one turns out.

HOW I SEE LIFE

John and I just got back from our traditional “dining out”. Once again a fantastic meal, but it is more than just the food. It is a great time for us to sit, enjoy a good house wine, superb food and no dishes to do(I always do the dishes here, but don’t ever tell my wife!!)
As we ended a fantastic meal, (all meals here begin with wine, bread and olives), John and I have had some great time for reflection. Even though we grew up in two different parts of the States, we grew up the same – same values of life. Something I have come to accept, I am a citizen of the world. In other words, I make due where ever I am.
They say home is where the heart is. Idaho will always be home for me, I will always miss the mountains, rivers, hunting, fishing, friends and family, but I also accept the fact I am where I am and there are also good things here as well.
There are no mountains in Denmark, to me hunting and fishing are way below second rate, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t good things in Denmark. I have found many good things and friends there. In fact some of my friendships have let me to other countries and adventures which I would have never experienced had I not moved to Denmark.
John and I were beginning our last meal at a local place we enjoy going, not because the food is great, but the owner is always full of smiles and grace(but the food is fantastic as well). It truly shows she cares about what she serves and her customers. The food is worth waiting for(we don’t have to) and I I always insist we stop there at least a couple time when I am down.
While there we get to reminisce about army meals, those of the C-rat type. John got the earlier versions than I did, even though he was in Vietnam, he got many of the Korean war era, where I was graced with Vietnam era rats. Then I will never forget the dehydrated pork patties in the first MREs issued.
When I left Idaho it was December 1992, time stopped for me – music, TV, most everything American. To prove it, in 2013 I was driving from Nampa to Caldwell. Now I know that road is straight between, but I got lost! Half way between I didn’t recognize anything – I didn’t know where I was. Finally I came to the “out skirts” of Caldwell and I knew where I was. I was a little shocked, amazed and bewildered. I truly knew I didn’t belong there. So where do I belong?
I guess that depends on where my hat is hanging. I’ve got 25 yrs in Denmark now. Is that home – good question. I don’t consider myself Danish, I still have an American passport. When I visit John in Portugal I feel at home there as well. The first year I was here to visit, John took me down and I got a “Fiscal” number, which is kind of like a residence number. Today I wouldn’t be able to get one. But I am a planner, I never leave a stone unturned. I now have another option to my life if I so choose. I know my wife would never leave Denmark, but what if something happened to her? What would I do? Good question. In life we always need to plan for the “unforeseen” , the thing which might happen but probably won’t. If we go through life thinking everything is cut in stone we will be surprised, maybe get a rude awaking we don’t want.
I guess for me I will always be flexible, able to overcome and adapt. Almost sounds like I believe in evolution??!!

YA EVER JUST WONDER?

Do you ever wonder “Why”? Being down here in Portugal, my mind has had ample time to vegetate. I have thought back on many things – for instance: Why do we need to know how long ago and why the universe started?
On the boob tube there’s a program on the National Geographic channel I watch about this subject. “They” tells us many millions of billions of years ago all of a sudden there was this BOOM, the big bang which started the world. From what I gather there are lots of people who have been given lots of money to figure this out, but what for? Why is this information important to you or me? I mean, who could really give a rats behind how the world started?
Now I grew up in the church, I have faith in God and I believe God is responsible for the creation of the world and everything here in. In accepting this, people don’t have to spend so much money, hire so many people to figure out how the universe started, we just accept it for fact. Now if you read Genesis 1:1 and 2, King James version, it reads: In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. 2 And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters.
To me this sounds like the beginning of the universe and we didn’t have to spend so much money to find this out. The thing with we people our thinking is so limited. We think in terms of time, and guess what? – God is not limited.
I wonder if the high powered guys learning about the big bang ever wondered if it was God who allowed the “big band” to create the world. Ask any of them they can’t tell you where the big bang came from. Ask any of them if they believe in Newton’s third law of Motion – For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. So tell me what was the action which caused the big bang? I bet they will look at you with a blank stare, not knowing how to answer it.
I remember as a kid being taught God created the world and everything in six days and He rested on the seventh. So tell me, how long is a day to God? We really don’t know. Ya think it might be something like a hundred millions of our human years?
We can’t deny the existence of the dinosaurs, we got the bones and such to prove them and how many millions of years old are they, When the Bible was written back in those days, they didn’t know how to explain many of the things we look at today and are able to explain through science.
The other thing science can’t explain is “How did life start?”. Well it just started they will say. They will talk about the spark of life, but where did this spark come from? I like how they explain how water came to earth by comets and such, yes this is practical. I have seen how they explain how the planets were formed, water came to the earth (evolution), but where did the spark of life come from? Where did the seeds for plants come from? Here we got them stumped.
I guess what I am getting to is: the more science tries to prove the start of the universe, our planet and lives, the more they are proving God did what the Bible said he did. All you got to do is point out Newton’s third law, and ask them what caused the big bang – after all, in their own thinking, nothing just happens.

VACATION REFLECTIONS AND REALITIES

It’s midday Monday, over half way into my vacation, so thought it was a good time for a little reflection – seeing how it is raining today and we can’t get out to do some of the things we planned.
It has been great. No vacation last year as I had an arthroscopic surgery on my right knee about this time last year. So I began into this long drawn out process of getting knee replacements as both needed it. I got screwed out of an operation last year because a stupid doctor has his head stuck up his third point of contact. My doctor and the surgeon who did the arthroscopic both were amazed he wouldn’t do the replacement. So after a summer of knowing pain personally, I will get the first one done this coming Monday, waiting until next winter to get the second one done.
The area here where John lives went through a fire last year. Much of the area around here he lives was burned with many families losing their homes, getting out with only the clothes on their backs. As we drove through the town of Serpins, a year later one could still see the scars remaining. Luck have it, Serpins was not destroyed, but many villages were. Serpins was lucky as much of the town is back to normal, but you can see many of the cork trees are black, yet they are hearty enough to survive, while most of the pines, and other species are standing dead, only to be later cut down for firewood or pulp. As we drove around the area I could see the surviving corks with their black bark but nice green leaves.
John was lucky, the fire burned up to within a hundred meters or so of his village, it was stopped because one of the villagers who is retired was able to call in a few favors and get enough support to stop it. It was tough as the village is on a slope and the draw below them had a chimney effect, pulling the fire towards them. He and along with many were evacuated while the wrath of the fire raged through the country side. Many who lost everything had insurance, while the majority didn’t, having to start again from virtually nothing. From what I have read and talked to the people around, it is once again all about the money involved in timber, mainly eucalyptus which is a very oily tree and every year sheds its bark leaving piles of this oily substance lying all over the forest’s floor. Large industrial forests have sprung up of eucalyptus because it is a fast growing tree and the pulp and paper industry want it for their products. It would cost vast amounts of money for the forest floor to be cleaned according to local and national laws, thus many believe the fires were not started by natural causes, read the below article: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4626896/Portuguese-fire-started-criminal-hand.html
Whether this can be proven or not, there is a lot of blindness in the government in complying to laws.
Normally I don’t get too much into political subjects in my blogs, but as it has directly affected lives of people I know and many around them, I felt I needed to say something.
Well by now the sun has started to peak out a bit, so will get out and try to do a couple things. I will be leaving this great vacation place Thursday morning, headed for Portugal, to play 18 holes of golf, if the weather is permitting. Then back to Denmark on Friday, winding up some business on Saturday and then Monday, I start to become the bionic man (I wish).

JOHN’S TV

I thought I needed to explain “TV” to some people. The first year, 2007 I was in Portugal, my friend stated his fireplace was his TV, so thus while there it is standard practice to refer to his fireplace(in the kitchen) as the TV. There are many benefits to this type of TV which the normal person will never know or experience. Thus I hope to open the eyes of many and expand your minds just a bit. So from now on when referring to TV, it is the fireplace.
First one up in the morning turns on the TV. The water pot is set on to make coffee or tea while the morning chores are done. When we are ready so is the water, no wasted time. We sit back enjoying that first cup of the day staring straight ahead into the screen.
Now let me ask you, how many you have a TV you can make your coffee on? It also provides warmth and you can get rid of your trash paper in it. Sure you need to get up once in a while to feed it, but you also got to get up to take a piss, get a drink, something to eat no matter what type of TV you are watching.
Last night for example, I cooked some great pork chops on the TV. Just before, John set the pot of taters on to boil. While we were eating had a pot of water getting warm to wash dishes. How many of you have such versatile TV?
Also we have no commercials, no ads and we don’t have to worry where the remote is, if the remote batteries go dead or if the power goes out! Yes we do have sound effects, depending on the type of wood we use in the TV depends on the noises. Really dry pine produces the old Snap, Crackle, and Pop. Eucalyptus, if not completely dry will sizzle and hiss, you can also see the water boiling out the ends. Oak lasts a long time as does chestnut. Last night we cooked chops over wet grapevine, what a fantastic flavor. See our TV is great, not like yours, which you can only turn on and off, and besides so much of the programming today is crap (oh yea, we can burn that in ours as well)
John’s TV is never out of date. It never needs a software upgrade. Yea, I guess we could get a bigger model but that is not necessary for full effect or enjoyment. We can dry clothes on our TV and even flick cigar ashes in our3s (just try that with yours).
I bet there is a lot of you who pay big money to visit a shrink! We don’t need one. Usually a couple evening with our TV and we got the problems of the world solved. Yes for this step it does good to have “qualified” friends present like, Jack, Jim, or Johnny. As of lately Jack has been present at most of our therapy sessions. Our TV somehow seems to make their presents a little more smooth. You need to give this a try sometime.
Yep, tonight after the dishes are done, we’ll turn out the lights, stoke up the TV, invite Jack for a visit and just vegetate. I’ll look over at John and ask him, “I wonder what all the common folk are doing tonight?”